Benjamin Graham Investment Philosophy

Benjamin Graham

Benjamin Graham, the father of value investing, was perhaps the most influential investment figure of all time.His work laid the foundation of modern security analysis, and two of his books,The Intelligent Investor (1949) and Security Analysis(1934), are investment classics that remain bestsellers to this day. His Life and work have been inspiration for many of today’s most successful investors, including Warren Buffett, Michael F. Price, and John Neff. A few words of wisdom include the following: (1) Be an Investor, not a speculator “Let us define the speculator as one who seeks to profit from market movements, without primary regard …Read more »

Warren Buffett Investment Philosophy

Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett’s philosophy can be summarized into key principles: If you had invested $100 in Berkshire Hathaway when he took over in 1965, you would have about $220,000 today.   He views investing as buying a piece of a business, rather than “renting” shares of a company for the short term. Buffett looks at business fundamentals and prefers a business that is: 1. simple and understandable. His purchases are not determined by gloomy economic forecasts, or pessimistic stock market forecasts.  He tends to put fairly large sums of money into things that he knows and management that he trusts.  He doesn’t invest …Read more »

The Forecasting Pitfall of Fundamental Analysis

The Association methodology is ‘contrarian’ because it is quite different than most applications of fundamental analysis. The fundamental analysis technique is generally used by banks, pension funds and the majority of security analysts.  There are different styles of fundamental investing which range from momentum and growth investing to value and contrarian investing. In general, a fundamentalist believes that a company’s true value can be determined by analyzing financial indicators such as sales, inventory etc.  A fundamentalist believes that a stock price can diverge from the company’s true value and he is convinced that the market must recognize this discrepancy over time. Momentum and growth …Read more »

Benj Gallander Investment Philosophy

Benj Gallander

Benj Gallander has among the highest returns, both short- and long-term, in North America. Co-editor of Contra the Heard Investment Letter, columnist for The Globe and Mail, writer for Bloomberg and Canadian MoneySaver, Gallander’s approach has the investment world buzzing. His approach to investing is decidedly Contrarian. He does not believe in buying and holding until perpetuity. He thinks that stop losses are idiotic, like playing cards with your hand open. He redefines conventional norms of the risk-reward relationship. He rarely buys a stock that does not have a chance of a minimum 100 per cent return. He remains unconcerned …Read more »

Contrarian Investing Philosophy

A Contrarian Investor, generally focuses on turnaround situations and stocks currently out of favor, practicing patience and long-term investing.  Contrarian investors known as Contrarians looks for strongly financed, growing companies that are undervalued by the market for the wrong reasons, believing that the market will come to appreciate their true value over time.  This investing approach can also be described as Contrarian, since such stocks are purchased when most investors believe that they are unattractive. It is also believed that by owning an undervalued quality stock, is a lower-risk method for seeking superior long-term returns. These stocks tend to be …Read more »